Sunday, June 14, 2015

D-Town Farm: "Experience The Peace, Love and Friendship of The ...

D-Town Farm: "Experience The Peace, Love and Friendship of The ...: Experience the Peace, Love and Friendship of the D-TownFarm Family of Volunteers and Staff every Saturday from 8am-12pm and Sundays from 9...

"Experience The Peace, Love and Friendship of The D-TownFarm Family of Volunteers every Saturday from 8AM-12PM and Sundays from 9AM to 12 PM":

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Experience the Peace, Love and Friendship of the D-TownFarm Family of Volunteers and Staff every Saturday from 8am-12pm and Sundays from 9am to 12 pm, located at 14027 W. Outer Drive, Detroit, MI, between Plymouth Rd., and Chicago Blvd.

For more information please call 313-345-3663.

Friday, June 12, 2015

Fresh locally grown D-Town Farm collard greens are available tomorrow, Saturday, June 13 from 9:00 a.m. - noon at D-Town Farm,14027 W. Outer Drive between Plymouth and W. Chicago. They are priced at $2.50 per 3/4 lb. bunch. Only 50 bunches left!


 

Fresh locally grown D-Town Farm collard greens are available tomorrow, Saturday, June 13 from 9:00 a.m. - noon at D-Town Farm,14027 W. Outer Drive between Plymouth and W. Chicago. They are priced at $2.50 per 3/4 lb. bunch. Only 50 bunches left!

Thursday, June 11, 2015

North End SOUP @ Red Door! Sunday, June 14 Red Door Gallery (7500 Oakland St @ Bethune St.

Learn about creative projects happening in the North End and vote on which project to fund with the money raised from the dinner. Anyone is welcome to attend the dinner, but all project proposals must benefit North End neighborhoods.


Next Dinner: North End SOUP @ Red Door! Sunday, June 14, 2015

Red Door Gallery (7500 Oakland St @ Bethune St. - North of East Grand Blvd)
Doors at 4:00 PM
Presentations start at 5. Dinner around 6. Winner announced by 7.
Suggested donation of $5 for SOUP, salad and a vote!


How it works:
Attendees pay $5 for soup & salad and vote on which project they think benefits the community the most. The winner goes home with all of the money raised at the door to carryout their project. At the dinner, North End residents and supporters connect, share ideas and community resources. Each dinner also features a local artist!
 

Working on a project that benefits North End neighborhoods?NE SOUP is a community pot-luck style dinner raising money for projects benefiting the North End Neighborhood.
The concept is simple, donate $5 at the door for soup, salad and a vote; listen to 4 short presentations on projects proposed to take place in the North End; cast your vote, eat dinner and the winning project goes home with all of the money raised.

NE SOUP is open to ALL residents and supporters of the North End.

Have an idea you want to submit? You can submit online at DetroitSOUP.com/NORTH-END
Food-makers also have a chance to make a 1-minute announcement about an upcoming event, organization, business or cause in front of the audience. Sign up to bring food at northendsoup@gmail.com.
DOORS AT 4 PM • PROGRAM STARTS AT 5
DINNER BY 6 • WINNER ANNOUNCED BY 7

Wednesday, March 18, 2015

The Detroit Black Community Food Security Network's 2015 "What's for Dinner? Kick off Lecture - Saturday of April, 18, 2015.

WFD Lecturer-Dr. Jessica Harris

Peace;

The Detroit Black Community Food Security Network's 2015 "What's for Dinner?" Lecture Series is moving to the Charles H. Wright Museum of African American History.  Lectures will take place from 2:00 - 4:00 p.m. on the third Saturdays of April, June, August and October.  There is no cost for admission.

We are kicking-off the 2015 Series, on April 18, with a lecture by nationally acclaimed author Dr. Jessica B. Harris.  Dr. Harris is the author of twelve cookbooks that share recipes from various parts of the African Diaspora.  Her latest book, "High on the Hog: A Culinary Journey from Africa to America," is a fascinating read that chronicles the influence of Africa on the foodways of America.  Dr. Harris will sign copies of her book immediately following the lecture.

The Charles H. Wright Museum of African American History is located at 315 E. Warren, Detroit, MI 48202.  For more information call the Detroit Black Community Food Security Network at 313.345.3663.

Please share this e-mail  and the attached flier widely.  We look forward to seeing you on April 18.

Respect,

Malik Yakini, Executive Director
Detroit Black Community Food Security Network

Friday, January 30, 2015

Youth Centered Food Justice Workshop - Sunday Feb 15th. - DBCFSN Office - 3800 Puritan - Det..MI. from 10:30am-12:30pm.

Peace Peace,

I am reaching out to members of the DBCFSN community and supporters to let  them know about a Youth Centered Food Justice workshop we will be holding on Sunday Feb 15th. If you missed the first one we did in December, now is your opportunity to participate.

The workshop will be held at the DBCFSN office at 3800 Puritan, from 10:30am-12:30pm.  We will take a basic look at the food system as the present, trace our favorite meals from fork to farm, and discuss D-Town Farms Mission and perspective on food. A light breakfast will be served, youth group leaders, and parents, are asked to provide lunch. a rough schedule is below.

We are focusing this workshop specifically towards Middle and High school age youth, so if you know any youth groups or individuals who may be interested please fwd them this message, with  my contact information, provided below.
If you are interested in participating please respond to this email, as an RSVP, with the number of youth you intend to bring with you, by Friday Feb 13th.
Hope to hear from you soon, and see you on the 15th.



Sunday Feb 15, 10:30am- 12:30pm
10:30am: Open /Breakfast Snacks
10:40am: Ice Breakers
11:00am: Workshop: Your Favorite Meal
11:30pm: Lunch Break- Pot Luck 
12:00pm: Discussion: DBCFSN & D-Town Farm
               12:30: Close
                         @ 3800 Puritan, DETROIT
Ras. A. Diaminah

Thursday, October 23, 2014

U.N. ‘Turn The Water Back On In Detroit’ | Black America Web





United Nations: ‘Turn The Water Back On In Detroit’



  • DETROIT (AP) — United Nations human rights experts described Detroit’s mass water shut-offs as “a man-made perfect storm” Monday and called on city officials to restore water to those unable to pay, including those with disabilities or chronic illnesses.
    Meanwhile, Detroit’s officials said the two lawyers’ actions and conclusions were agenda-driven and not based on “facts” about the city’s progress in helping residents keep or regain service.
    Leilani Farha and Catarina de Albuquerque, who were in town to observe the effect of water service shut-offs, said they affect the poorest and most vulnerable — and particularly discriminate against Detroit’s majority black population.
    The representatives of the United Nations Human Rights Office of the High Commissioner made the trip after activists appealed to the U.N. for assistance. They visited residents who have lost water service or have struggled to keep it, and they met with Detroit Mayor Mike Duggan and water department officials for about two hours Monday morning.
    The city, the nation’s largest municipality to file for bankruptcy, said it made about 27,000 shut-offs between Jan. 1 and Sept. 30. Most shut-offs were halted for several weeks during the summer to give residents a chance to enter payment plans but they resumed and topped 5,100 in September.
    The U.N. officials cited falling population, rising unemployment and a utility passing on higher costs associated with an aging system. De Albuquerque said she has seen shut-offs in other U.S. cities and developed nations, but nothing like Detroit.
    “Our conclusion is that you have here in Detroit a man-made perfect storm,” de Albuquerque said. “The scale of the disconnections in the city is unprecedented.”
    The mayor’s top aide, Alexis Wiley, said the city is “very disappointed” with the U.N. visit. She said Detroit is helping residents by beefing up customer service, getting 33,000 people in payment plans — up 15,000 since August — and logging a more than 50 percent drop in residential calls for water assistance.